Apartment Hunt
Personal, Real Estate

Finding a new apartment is a big deal. There are a lot of things you need to consider before deciding where to live. And in today’s fast-paced world, you’re also busy and have a lot going on in your life—so it can be hard to keep track of all the places you’ve seen and visits you’ve made. However, with the right template to keep track of your visits, you can compare everything from buildings, to units, to neighborhoods, and even realtors (and their realties) all in one place to find your ideal apartment.

Moving is one of the most stressful things you can do! So anything that can be done to minimize the anxiety and stress, you should do. One of the most effective ways to do this is to take a deep breath and get organized. As you tour different apartments, you’ll inevitable think about different living situations—from the apartment interior, to the layout, to the location and places surrounding it.

Here are some of the templates highlights and features, by table:

Buildings

Apartments are part of… well, buildings. So no surprise here, needing a Buildings table. That building, however, has its own set of details, like an image of it, the neighborhood, how walkable the area is, and what the public transportation is like surrounding it.

Fields

  • Name. The name of the apartment building or community.
  • Image. An image of the building. Good for remembering the area!
  • Neighborhood. The neighborhood that the building is in. The first rule in real estate is: Location, location, location.
  • Address. The address of the apartment.
  • Unit(s). This is a linked field to the Units table to demonstrate which units pertain to each building.
  • Walkability. Most locations are now scored on their walkability on a scale of 1-100. The higher the score, the better.
  • Transit. Similar to Walkability, this field is to you to score the apartment’s proximity to public transit (trains, buses, etc.) on a scale of 1-100. The higher the score, the better.
  • Built. The year the building was built. Though some structures have been around for a long time, they’ve been remodeled and rehabbed. Nevertheless, it’s always good to get a sense of how old the building is to be able to determine the condition of it and how it has been taken care of.
  • Notes. A capture-all field for any notes regarding the building in question.

Views

  • All Buildings. Displays all buildings, sorted by name in alphabetical order.
  • Walker-friendly. Displays all buildings that have a walkability score higher than 80 in descending order from highest to lowest.
  • Transit-friendly. Displays all buildings that have a transit score score higher than 80 in descending order from highest to lowest.
  • Top-tier location. Displays all buildings that have a walkability and transit score higher than 90. These are the top-tier living locations!

Keep in mind that these are preliminary thresholds that you can (and should) adjust to your liking. If you’d consider an apartment building with an 85+ walkability and transit score, by all means, adjust the criteria.

Units

Units are the apartments themselves. Units live within buildings, but they have their own set of details, including, but not limited to: The number of bedrooms/bathrooms, the monthly rent, and if they are pet-friendly. This table also contains other useful fields related to your apartment hunt, such as the date that the apartment is available, the realtor responsible for showing the apartment, and the status of the tour. It also comes with a field that lets you keep track of your application status for the apartment unit.

Fields

  • Name. The name of the unit.
  • Building. This is a linked field to the Buildings table, which displays which building the unit belongs to.
  • Pictures. Images of the unit so you don’t forget what it looked like from the interior!
  • Bedrooms. The number of bedrooms the unit contains.
  • Bathrooms. The number of bathrooms the unit contains.
  • Rent. The monthly rent price of the unit.
  • Allows Pets. A checkbox that allows you to keep track of which units allow pets and which don’t.
  • Available. The date that the unit is available.
  • Tour. The status of the tour for the unit. There are four statuses by default: Inquired, Scheduled, Toured, and Canceled/Unresponsive.
  • Applied. A checkbox to easily tick whether you’ve submitted an application for the unit or not.
  • Notes. A catch-all notes field to capture thoughts and opinions on the individual units.
  • Realtor. This is a linked field to the Realtors table, which displays which realtor is responsible for showing the unit.

Views

  • All Units. Displays all units, sorted in ascending order (from lowest to highest) by the monthly rent price.
  • Submitted Application. Displays all units that you have submitted an application for, sorted in ascending order by the monthly rent price.
  • Haven’t Applied. Displays all units that you have not submitted an application for, sorted in ascending order by the monthly rent price.
  • Allows Pets. Displays all units that allow pets, sorted in ascending order by the monthly rent price.

Neighborhoods

What’s the number one rule in real estate? Location, location, location. This table provides a birds-eye view into which neighborhood encompasses each building.

Fields

  • Name. The name of the neighborhood.
  • Buildings. This is a linked field to the Buildings table, which displays every building that is located in each neighborhood.
  • Zip Code. The zip code that the neighborhood pertains to.
  • Notes. General notes field about the neighborhood.

Views

  • All Neighborhoods. Displays all neighborhoods, sorted alphabetically by name.

Realties

During your apartment search, you’re likely to encounter a handful of different realties that are responsible for showing various apartments. These realties have both generic contact information, as well as information about their in-house realtors.

Fields

  • Name. The name of the realty.
  • Email. The realty’s best contact email address.
  • Phone. The realty’s phone number.
  • Realtors. This is a linked field to the Realtors table, which shows every realtor that belongs to a particular realty.
  • Notes. A space to jot down notes about the realtors themselves or tips they might provide during your apartment hunting process.

Views

  • All Realties. Displays all realties, sorted alphabetically by name.

Realtors

What is a realty without realtors? As you scavenge for your next apartment, you’ll likely meet many realtors, all of them who will have a phone number, email, and more. This table allows you keep track of all that, including which units they’re responsible for showing, and of course, the realty that they belong to.

Fields

  • Name. The name of the realtor.
  • Picture. A space to store a profile picture of the realtor. Most realtors have a picture on their online presence, so drag and drop, or import from URL.
  • Contact. The method in which you communicated with the realtor. All realtors expect inbound communications, but there are others who also do a lot of outreach.
  • Realty. This is a linked field to the Realties table. It shows which realty the realtor belongs to.
  • Email. The realtor’s email address.
  • Phone. The realtor’s phone number.
  • Unit(s). This is a linked field to the Units table. It shows which unit (or units) the realtor is responsible for showing.

Views

  • All Realtors. Displays all realtors, sorted alphabetically by name.